Weekly Interlinear Poem







This is the poem
for the week of March 23.
A new interlinear poem
is available each Monday.

Send me e-mail - robert15115@gmail.com
Robert Jackson

"Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?"

-Shakespeare's Sonnet No. 8


Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Music to hear - the poet addresses the listener as "Music," a personification
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy.
Continues the idea that the listener is "Music"
Why lov'st thou that which thou receiv'st not gladly
Why do you love music but you are a sad listener?
Or else receiv'st with pleasure thine annoy?
thine annoy=that which annoys you
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
they=well-tuned sounds
confounds=destroys

In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
singleness=(1) unmarried state plus (2) intolerance of harmonies
parts=particular voices in polyphonic music
bear=be responsible for

Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
musical instruments such as lutes were strung in pairs
Strikes each in each by mutual ordering,
Resembling sire and child and happy mother
Who, all in one, one pleasing note do sing,
Whose speechless song being many, seeming one,
speechless song=instrumental music
being many, seeming one=several instruments playing music together

Sings this to thee: 'Thou single wilt prove none.'
single=unaccompanied
prove none=turn out to be neither a player in harmony with others nor a part of a family






Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy.
Why lov'st thou that which thou receiv'st not gladly
Or else receiv'st with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
Strikes each in each by mutual ordering,
Resembling sire and child and happy mother
Who, all in one, one pleasing note do sing,
Whose speechless song being many, seeming one,
Sings this to thee: 'Thou single wilt prove none.'